Coin Prices Slightly Affected by Precious Metals: 02/26/2024: Gold $2035.8 | Silver $22.95

Top 11 Rarest Presidential Dollar Coins

Trillions of Presidential Dollar coins have been made by the U.S. Mints since 2007. That means they are not rare to find in the market, usually at a face value of less than $1. However, like any other coin series, there are a few scarce varieties that can fetch upwards of $500.

The rarest Presidential $1 coins are those with major mint errors particularly Missing Edge Lettering. This variety can sell for more than $2,000 at auctions. Reverse Proof and Special Strike coins are also rare types in this series.

Presidential Dollar Coins
Credit: pcgs.com

Presidential $1 Coins are a special subset in the coin collecting market, captivating collectors’ attention with their historical narratives and potential rarity. Read on to know the rarest of them all, how they are valued, and what makes them so unique!

What Are Presidential Dollar Coins

The Presidential Dollar Coins came into being through the U.S Presidential $1 Coin Act passed by the U.S Congress in 2005.

This led to the creation of the Presidential $1 Coin Program in 2007 where the first presidential coin was made featuring George Washington on the obverse side and Lady Liberty image on the reverse.

The Act stated the purpose of the mintage under Public Law 109-145:

“To require the Secretary of the Treasury to mint coins in commemoration of each of the Nation’s past Presidents and their spouses, respectively, to improve circulation of the $1 coin, to create a new bullion coin, and for other purposes.”

According to the act, only presidents who had passed away for more than two years would be included in the program. Also, the coins would be made in the same order in which the Presidents served, with each coin showing the years the presidents were in power.

By 2011 there was a surplus of these coins in the inventory and therefore the U.S. Mint decided to stop making the coins for circulation and instead focus on creating a small quantity for collectors.

This continued till 2016 when the Presidential $1 Coin Program came to an end with the release of the 2016 Ronald Reagan coin.

However, after the passing of the 41st US President George H.W. Bush in 2018, President Trump enacted a law calling for the creation of a Presidential Coin to honor Bush.

Features of Presidential Dollar Coins

Here are the key characteristics of all the coins under the program:

Year of Minting 2007 – 2011 (Circulation)

2012 – 2016, 2020 (Collectors Only)

Varieties · Circulation Strike Coins: P, D, and S

· Proof Coins
· Special Strike Coins

Obverse Design Portrait of the respective president, name of the president, their term dates, and the order in which they served are inscribed on the coin.

The motto “IN GOD WE TRUST” (in 2009 and later)

Reverse Design Image of the Statue of Liberty.

Inscriptions: “UNITED STATES OF AMERICA” and “$1.”

Mint Branch Facility Philadelphia (P), Denver (D), San Francisco (S)
Metal Composition 88.5% Copper, 6% Zinc, 3.5% Manganese, and 2% Nickel
Diameter 26.49 mm (1.043 inches)
Thickness 2.0 mm (0.0787 inches).
Mass 8 grams (0.26 troy oz)
Edge Engraved inscriptions “E PLURIBUS UNUM,” the mint mark (P for Philadelphia, D for Denver, or S for San Francisco), the year of minting, and the motto “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

The motto was removed in 2009 and put on the obverse.

What Makes Presidential $1 Coins Rare

What makes Presidential Dollar Coins rare are the Mint errors that occurred during their making.

During the process of making the first coins (2007-P George Washington) in Philadelphia, the mint made an errorand skipped the edge lettering process completely on some units, creating about 50,000 coins with Missing Edge Lettering.

The Missing Edge Lettering conversely created a unique aspect towards the coin – scarcity. Compared to the standard coins, 2007 George Washington coins with Missing Edge Lettering were low in number and thus much more valuable to collectors.

Over time, many more errors and unique design choices have been spotted including double edge lettering. Whether major or minor, these issues are rare in any given year and collectors value these coins higher.

Apart from possessing major mint errors, Presidential Dollar coins can be rare if they include more than one of the following features:

  • Higher grades (grade 66 and above are the rarest)
  • Premium quality (i.e., Proof, Reverse Proof, and Special Strike Coins)
  • Come from a year with low number of coins issued (low mintage)

Top 11 Rarest & Most Valuable Presidential Dollar Coins

In this list, we have included rare coins that can still be found in circulation, in collectors’ pockets, or bought at auctions. They are uniquely valued Presidential $1 coins with rare errors, high grading, and special strikes.

This list will help you know which rare coins are liquid in the market, in the highest demand, and have the highest valuation.

Here is the summary of the top presidential dollar coin value chart:

Rank Presidential Dollar Coin Typical Value For Coin (PCGS) Highest Auction Price
1 2007 Washington Missing Edge Lettering $16 – $4,250 $1, 007
2 2007 Thomas Jefferson Missing Edge Lettering $40 – $6,500 $1, 725
3 2007 Thomas Jefferson Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike) $50 – $1000 $469
4 2007 James Madison Missing Edge Lettering $70 – $4000 $978
5 2007 James Madison Missing Edge lettering (Special Strike) $30 – $500 $2, 530
6 2008 James Monroe Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike)
$150 – $1600 $312
7 2009 W.H Harrison Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike) $300 – $775 $1, 955
8 2009 John Tyler Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike) $1,000 N/A
9 2015 P Harry S. Truman (Reverse Proof) $85 – $600 $511
10 2015-P Eisenhower Reverse Proof $60 – $600 $150
11 2007 John Adams First Day of Issue $50 – $600 $275

1. 2007 $1 Washington Missing Edge Lettering: $16 – $4,250

2007 $1 Washington Missing Edge Lettering

Coin Features:

  • Presidential $1 Coin: 2007 George Washington
  • Error: Missing Edge Lettering
  • Mint Branch: Philadelphia
  • Variety: Regular Strike
  • Mintage: N/A
  • Edge: Plain
  • Typical Coin Value: $20 – $4,250
  • Highest Auction Price: $1, 007 for MS67 Grade in 2010

Featuring the same design as other Presidential coins, this coin became the first to have a plain edge with missing lettering.

Edge lettering was a unique aspect of the Presidential Dollar Coin series, typically including “E PLURIBUS UNUM,” the mint mark, the year of minting, and the motto “IN GOD WE TRUST.”

However, due to production decisions in the early stages of the program, some coins, including the 2007 George Washington Coin, were minted without the edge lettering. Some called them “Godless dollars” since they lacked the motto.

As the first coin in the Presidential Dollar Coin series, the 2007 George Washington Coin carries historical significance as it initiated a collection dedicated to honoring the nation’s presidents.

The number of coins made with this issue is not known but PCGS has graded over 20,000 Washington $1 coins with missing edge lettering.

The value of this rare coin appreciates with it the grade where MS61 is the lowest at approximately $18 while the MS67 is the common highest grade at $260. Getting MS68 is very rare but will be priced at about $4,250.

2. 2007 $1 Thomas Jefferson Missing Edge Lettering: $40 – $6500

2007 $1 Thomas Jefferson Missing Edge Lettering

Coin Features:

  • Presidential $1 Coin: 2007 P Thomas Jefferson
  • Error: Missing Edge Lettering
  • Mint Branch: Philadelphia
  • Variety: Regular Strike
  • Mintage: N/A
  • Edge: Plain
  • Typical Coin Value: $40 – $6500
  • Highest Auction Price: $1,725 for MS66 in 2009

The 2007 Jefferson is the third entry into the missing edge coin in the Presidential dollar series. The second Presidential dollar coin (2007 John Adams) also featured plain edged coins but these were in higher numbers hence not so rare.

These coins are scarcer than the first two coins and most of them can be found in grade MS66. Due to their lower quantity, they sold for up to $5,000 when they first went on sale. Since then they haven’t lost their demand with the best qualities (MS68) demanding a hefty $6,500 price – the highest valuation on this list.

3. 2007 $1 Thomas Jefferson Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike): $50 – $1000

2007 $1 Thomas Jefferson Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike)

Coin Features:

  • Presidential $1 Coin: 2007 P Thomas Jefferson
  • Error: Missing Edge Lettering
  • Variety: Special Strike
  • Mint Branch: Philadelphia
  • Mintage: N/A
  • Edge: Plain
  • Typical Coin Value: $50 – $1000
  • Highest Auction Price: $469 for SP66 in 2012

The Missing Edge Lettering error came into the 2007 Jefferson in the form of a Special Strike variant.

Special Strike coins are of higher quality than regular circulation coins but sit between circulation strike coins and Proof strike coins in terms of quality.

This coin is rare because it is among a limited number of coins that have been graded by PCGS for having a Satin Finish and a plain edge. It has a combined rarity factor – Missing Edge Lettering error and a Premium Satin Finish.

There are only five different types of Presidential dollar coins with these two combinations.

4. 2007 $1 James Madison Missing Edge Lettering: $70 – $4000

2007 $1 James Madison Missing Edge Lettering

Coin Features:

  • Presidential $1 Coin: 2007 P James Madison
  • Error: Missing Edge Lettering
  • Mint Branch: Philadelphia
  • Variety: Regular Strike
  • Mintage: N/A
  • Edge: Plain
  • Typical Coin Value: $70 – $4000
  • Highest Auction Price: $978 for MS65 Grade in 2010

With the popularity of the first missing edge lettering in 2007, the hype for these coins became higher and many collectors invested into it.

2007 James Madison came with the plain-edged coins too but in fewer numbers than before. Minted in Philadelphia, the number of units made with this error is unknown but PCGS has only graded a few over 130 making it a rare ‘dime’.

MS65 and MS66 are the most common of the bunch, priced between $275 – $600. The is only one MS67 that has ever been graded and it is valued at $4,000.

5. 2007 $1 James Madison Missing Edge lettering (Special Strike): $30 – $500

2007 $1 James Madison Missing Edge lettering (Special Strike)

Coin Features:

  • Presidential $1 Coin: 2007 P (Special Strike) James Madison
  • Error: Missing Edge Lettering
  • Mint Branch: Philadelphia
  • Variety: Special Strike
  • Mintage: 895, 628
  • Edge: Plain
  • Typical Coin Value: $30 – $500
  • Highest Auction Price: $2, 530 for SP66 in 2009

This is another special strike coin with the edge error. It is the second coin with a rare combination of a Satin Finish and Missing Edge Lettering.

It is less valuable than the predecessor partly because the amount of coins this time around was more than 890,000 making it less rare compared to the 2007 P (Special Strike) Thomas Jefferson $1 Coin.

6. 2008 $1 James Monroe Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike): $150 – $1600

2008 $1 James Monroe Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike)
Coin Features:

  • Presidential $1 Coin: 2008 P James Monroe
  • Error: Missing Edge Lettering
  • Mint Branch: Philadelphia
  • Variety: Special Strike
  • Mintage: N/A
  • Edge: Plain
  • Typical Coin Value: $150 – $1600
  • Highest Auction Price: $312 for SP68 in 2023

It is the third rarest special strike coin with the edge error. It includes the combination of a Satin Finish and Missing Edge Lettering.

Since they are made with high quality processes and handmade techniques, this coin specimen is available mostly in higher grades from SP66 to SP68.

7. 2009 W.H Harrison Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike): $300 – $775

2009 W.H Harrison Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike)

Coin Features:

  • Presidential $1 Coin: 2009 William Henry Harrison
  • Error: Missing Edge Lettering
  • Mint Branch: N/A
  • Variety: Special Strike
  • Mintage: 784, 614
  • Edge: Plain
  • Typical Coin Value: $300 – $775
  • Highest Auction Price: $1,955 for SP69 in 2010

2009 (Special Strike) W.H. Harrison is the fourth rarest special strike coin with the edge error. It features the combination of a Satin Finish and Missing Edge lettering.

8. 2009 $1 John Tyler Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike): $1,000

2009 $1 John Tyler Missing Edge Lettering (Special Strike)

Coin Features:

  • Presidential $1 Coin: 2009 John Tyler
  • Error: Missing Edge Lettering
  • Mint Branch: N/A
  • Variety: Special Strike
  • Mintage: 784, 614
  • Edge: Plain
  • Typical Coin Value: $1000
  • Highest Auction Price: N/A

Last but definitely not least, the 2009 (Special Strike) John Tyler is the fifth and final known Presidential dollar coin featuring the combination of a Satin Finish and Missing Edge lettering.

Only three of these 2009 Tyler coins have been graded by PCGS. All three are SP66 rated at a valuation of $1,000 each.

9. 2015 P $1 Harry S. Truman (Reverse Proof): $85 – $600

2015 P $1 Harry S. Truman (Reverse Proof)

Coin Features:

  • Presidential $1 Coin: 2015 Harry S. Truman
  • Error: None
  • Metal Composition: 77% Copper, 12 % Zinc, 1% other over a pure copper core
  • Mint Branch: Philadelphia
  • Variety: Reverse Proof
  • Mintage: 16, 812
  • Edge: Lettered
  • Typical Coin Value: $85 – $600
  • Highest Auction Price: $511 for PR70 in 2023

On June 30th 2015, the U.S. Minth offered this coin as the first Presidential Dollar in a Reverse Proof (RP) format. RP means that the coin features an inverted proof finish where the background is frosted but other design elements are polished to a mirror-like finish.

That is opposite to what happens on a Proof Coin. Essentially, an RP coin has a shinier foreground while a Proof coin has a shinier background.

RP coins are rare regardless of the series and this being the first one in the Presidential dollar series makes it one of a kind.

10. 2015-P Eisenhower Reverse Proof: $60 – $600

2015-P Eisenhower Reverse Proof

Coin Features:

  • Presidential $1 Coin: 2015-P Dwight D. Eisenhower
  • Error: None
  • Metal Composition: 77% Copper, 12 % Zinc, 1% other over a pure copper core
  • Mint Branch: Philadelphia
  • Variety: Reverse Proof
  • Mintage: 16,744
  • Edge: Lettered
  • Typical Coin Value: $60 – $600
  • Highest Auction Price: $150 for PR69 in 2021

Majority of coins in this category are PR69 graded, valued at around $125 price tag. This is the second Reverse Proof coin made in the Presidential Dollar Program making it another rare addition to your collection.

You can find a few on sale at Collectors Corner for about $200.

11. 2007 John Adams Missing Edge Lettering First Day of Issue: $50 – $600

2007 John Adams Missing Edge Lettering First Day of Issue

Coin Features:

  • Presidential $1 Coin: 2007 John Adams
  • Error: Missing Edge Lettering
  • Mint Branch: Philadelphia
  • Variety: Regular Strike (First Day of Issue)
  • Mintage: N/A
  • Edge: Plain
  • Typical Coin Value: $50 – $600
  • Highest Auction Price: $275 for MS64 in 2012

First Day of Issues are coins that were purchased within the first day of release by the U.S. Mint. There are several in the presidential series but none have the unique combination of this 2007 Adams coin.

The 2007 (Regular Strike) Adams coin combines a plain edge with a First Day of Issue package, making it one of a kind.

Several copies have been sold since its release for over $100 each.

Also Read: Most Valuable Morgan Silver Dollar

How Many Presidential Dollar Coins Are There?

There is a total of 40 different types of Presidential $1 coins. Even though only 39 Presidents have passed away in the stipulated period, Grover Cleveland served as the 22nd and 24th U.S. President, making the total count of Presidential $1 coins 40 instead of 39.

Keep in mind that each president coin has several varieties including proof and special strike coins, as well as multiple errors that result in a wide range of the same coin.

Final Thoughts

Some collectors are fans of these coins because of the allure of holding a tangible artifact that connects them to bygone leaders and pivotal moments in American history. Others prefer collecting them so that they can keep a commemoration of their favorite presidents.

Whether for the history buff or the seasoned collector, these coins stand as fascinating artifacts that continue to shine a light on the past while offering the potential for a prosperous future in the realm of a collector’s investments.

Leave a Comment